When a project is undertaken, it is taken up for a particular outcome, most of the times either to resolve a problem, or a product for the markets. The organizational leadership sets the organizational direction and mandates. These mandates drive the need for completing projects within constraints. The organizational priorities are driven by stakeholders and investors needs and wants. Organizational performance on the set targets drives shareholder value, market reputation and customer acquisition & retention. The organization has responsibilities towards investors, shareholders and customers.

Project Managers have to work within the set mandates and organizational mandates. And therefore managers in the companies want things to be done and done on time and budget.

Managing a project within schedule is serious business.

Dead serious for your professional growth in the organization!

Managing the time schedule is the single most important activity towards achieving the on-time delivery of your projects. During that annual performance appraisal ritual you can be sure the time schedule management issues are going to top the agenda for discussion between you and the appraiser.

Schedule Management can be looked from following major perspectives:

- Development draft schedule

- Finalizing schedule

- Making refinements

- Communicating the schedule

- Tracking and Controlling schedule

Action without a plan is fatal. A project without any thoroughly developed schedule is designed to fail. For any project, , whether for an in-house activity or for a customer, a plan should be the starting point. A plan that is like a map that shows how, as each individual task is completed, we are able to reach the destination – ‘a completed project’. The basic data that is essential is the task duration or how long it will take to complete. That is directly related to the resources used of course. In the larger picture we shall need to know, how they relate to other tasks required in the project. It is important to know if the task follows, precedes or is done in parallel to other tasks. One would need to know if there are dependencies or if another project task cannot start until another one finishes or tasks that must start together or end together and so on. Start time, end time, duration, the dependencies and who is the owner or the responsible person are the data that’s relevant. While a tabular representation can convey the complete plan information, a graphic presentation is far easier to comprehend. It makes the interrelationships between tasks jump out of the page.

Finalizing the Time Schedule

On this time schedule, what is most crucial is the time estimate for each task and how that is affected by resource application (increase/decrease). Like any structured activity, you start with a first cut estimates and then try refining the plan. It is vital to remember that the time schedule is not written in stone. Besides these initial iterations for refining the plan, the schedule can change as the project progresses and corrections are called for depending on the actual progress of the tasks. Additional activities that relate to making the plans are communicating with all stakeholders in the plan. It is essential that you get buy-in from the project resources.

Many a times, particularly for new projects, these time estimates depend largely on the experience of the people who estimate the tasks. So a process of review is essential. Besides, any organization will require multiple levels of approvals starting from the project manager to several higher levels. Budgetary needs also dictate these levels of approval.

When a project is undertaken, it is taken up for a particular outcome, most of the times either to resolve a problem, or a product for the markets. The organizational leadership sets the organizational direction and mandates. These mandates drive the need for completing projects within constraints. The organizational priorities are driven by stakeholders and investors needs and wants. Organizational performance on the set targets drives shareholder value, market reputation and customer acquisition & retention. The organization has responsibilities towards investors, shareholders and customers.

Project Managers have to work within the set mandates and organizational mandates. And therefore managers in the companies want things to be done and done on time and budget.

Managing a project within schedule is serious business.

Dead serious for your professional growth in the organization!

Managing the time schedule is the single most important activity towards achieving the on-time delivery of your projects. During that annual performance appraisal ritual you can be sure the time schedule management issues are going to top the agenda for discussion between you and the appraiser.

Schedule Management can be looked from following major perspectives:

- Development draft schedule

- Finalizing schedule

- Making refinements

- Communicating the schedule

- Tracking and Controlling schedule

Action without a plan is fatal. A project without any thoroughly developed schedule is designed to fail. For any project, , whether for an in-house activity or for a customer, a plan should be the starting point. A plan that is like a map that shows how, as each individual task is completed, we are able to reach the destination – ‘a completed project’. The basic data that is essential is the task duration or how long it will take to complete. That is directly related to the resources used of course. In the larger picture we shall need to know, how they relate to other tasks required in the project. It is important to know if the task follows, precedes or is done in parallel to other tasks. One would need to know if there are dependencies or if another project task cannot start until another one finishes or tasks that must start together or end together and so on. Start time, end time, duration, the dependencies and who is the owner or the responsible person are the data that’s relevant. While a tabular representation can convey the complete plan information, a graphic presentation is far easier to comprehend. It makes the interrelationships between tasks jump out of the page.

Finalizing the Time Schedule

On this time schedule, what is most crucial is the time estimate for each task and how that is affected by resource application (increase/decrease). Like any structured activity, you start with a first cut estimates and then try refining the plan. It is vital to remember that the time schedule is not written in stone. Besides these initial iterations for refining the plan, the schedule can change as the project progresses and corrections are called for depending on the actual progress of the tasks. Additional activities that relate to making the plans are communicating with all stakeholders in the plan. It is essential that you get buy-in from the project resources.

Many a times, particularly for new projects, these time estimates depend largely on the experience of the people who estimate the tasks. So a process of review is essential. Besides, any organization will require multiple levels of approvals starting from the project manager to several higher levels. Budgetary needs also dictate these levels of approval.

Project Schedule Management

July 28, 2009
By

When a project is undertaken, it is taken up for a particular outcome, most of the times either to resolve a problem, or a product for the markets. The organizational leadership sets the organizational direction and mandates. These mandates drive the need for completing projects within constraints. The organizational priorities are driven by stakeholders and investors needs and wants. Organizational performance on the set targets drives shareholder value, market reputation and customer acquisition & retention. The organization has responsibilities towards investors, shareholders and customers.

Project Managers have to work within the set mandates and organizational mandates. And therefore managers in the companies want things to be done and done on time and budget.

Managing a project within schedule is serious business.

Dead serious for your professional growth in the organization!

Managing the time schedule is the single most important activity towards achieving the on-time delivery of your projects. During that annual performance appraisal ritual you can be sure the time schedule management issues are going to top the agenda for discussion between you and the appraiser.

Schedule Management can be looked from following major perspectives:

- Development draft schedule

- Finalizing schedule

- Making refinements

- Communicating the schedule

- Tracking and Controlling schedule

Action without a plan is fatal. A project without any thoroughly developed schedule is designed to fail. For any project, , whether for an in-house activity or for a customer, a plan should be the starting point. A plan that is like a map that shows how, as each individual task is completed, we are able to reach the destination – ‘a completed project’. The basic data that is essential is the task duration or how long it will take to complete. That is directly related to the resources used of course. In the larger picture we shall need to know, how they relate to other tasks required in the project. It is important to know if the task follows, precedes or is done in parallel to other tasks. One would need to know if there are dependencies or if another project task cannot start until another one finishes or tasks that must start together or end together and so on. Start time, end time, duration, the dependencies and who is the owner or the responsible person are the data that’s relevant. While a tabular representation can convey the complete plan information, a graphic presentation is far easier to comprehend. It makes the interrelationships between tasks jump out of the page.

Finalizing the Time Schedule

On this time schedule, what is most crucial is the time estimate for each task and how that is affected by resource application (increase/decrease). Like any structured activity, you start with a first cut estimates and then try refining the plan. It is vital to remember that the time schedule is not written in stone. Besides these initial iterations for refining the plan, the schedule can change as the project progresses and corrections are called for depending on the actual progress of the tasks. Additional activities that relate to making the plans are communicating with all stakeholders in the plan. It is essential that you get buy-in from the project resources.

Many a times, particularly for new projects, these time estimates depend largely on the experience of the people who estimate the tasks. So a process of review is essential. Besides, any organization will require multiple levels of approvals starting from the project manager to several higher levels. Budgetary needs also dictate these levels of approval.

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