A picture is worth a thousand words. That is equally true in case of planning and monitoring the time schedule of a project. Depiction of tasks, interdependence of tasks, the sequence and the organization can actually be shown by a drawing. The picture produced by a few simple drawing artefacts is able to depict these interrelationships and even external dependencies. If you need to divide the project into understandable sub structures the drawings produced by Gantt charts can give you that too.

The Gantt Chart

The Gantt chart is a tool developed by an American engineer Henry Gantt. Though he had developed it as a production control tool it is now used in project time schedule depiction and quite effectively. With a few simple elements this tool can bring out the complete interrelationships of tasks in a project, the sequences used to implement the project and thus the overall structure. Gantt charts illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Terminal elements and summary elements comprise the WBS of the project. Gantt charts can be used to show current schedule status using percent-complete shadings and a vertical "TODAY" line.

It is really a horizontal bar chart. Each bar depicts an activity and it is shown against a timeline that appears on the horizontal scale of the graph. Vertical axis is not to scale and the activities are described one after another vertically. A corresponding horizontal bar shows the star of the activity and ends at the time when the activity is supposed to end.

So the time relationships of the tasks are immediately apparent from the diagram. Parallel activities appear vertically separated yet over similar time scale. Activities that must follow one another appear sequentially on the chart. Dependencies are depicted by a line. For example if the end of an activity is a necessary pre-condition for the beginning of another, a line with an arrowhead shows that dependency. The line extends from the end point of the activity which must complete before the other can begin. The line ends up at the start point of the next activity that depends on it. So that one look at such drawings and the dependencies are immediately very clear. Though other types of dependencies also can be shown, it is this relationship that is used more often.

It is immediately obvious, the sequencing and the organization and the WBs that we emphasized in earlier sections makes drawing the Gantt chart that much more effective. The diagram brings out sequential relationships between tasks, if one activity is dependent on another, the overall structure etc. can be visualized very easily. Immediately, the chart turns into a very effective tool for status reporting and a monitoring tool. It clearly speaks the language of time schedules and makes it easy for describing to other stakeholders what’s going on with the project.

For breaking down a project into bite sized chunks, parts of the chart with clearly defined intermediate milestones can help you visualize the pieces equally easily.

A picture is worth a thousand words. That is equally true in case of planning and monitoring the time schedule of a project. Depiction of tasks, interdependence of tasks, the sequence and the organization can actually be shown by a drawing. The picture produced by a few simple drawing artefacts is able to depict these interrelationships and even external dependencies. If you need to divide the project into understandable sub structures the drawings produced by Gantt charts can give you that too.

The Gantt Chart

The Gantt chart is a tool developed by an American engineer Henry Gantt. Though he had developed it as a production control tool it is now used in project time schedule depiction and quite effectively. With a few simple elements this tool can bring out the complete interrelationships of tasks in a project, the sequences used to implement the project and thus the overall structure. Gantt charts illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Terminal elements and summary elements comprise the WBS of the project. Gantt charts can be used to show current schedule status using percent-complete shadings and a vertical "TODAY" line.

It is really a horizontal bar chart. Each bar depicts an activity and it is shown against a timeline that appears on the horizontal scale of the graph. Vertical axis is not to scale and the activities are described one after another vertically. A corresponding horizontal bar shows the star of the activity and ends at the time when the activity is supposed to end.

So the time relationships of the tasks are immediately apparent from the diagram. Parallel activities appear vertically separated yet over similar time scale. Activities that must follow one another appear sequentially on the chart. Dependencies are depicted by a line. For example if the end of an activity is a necessary pre-condition for the beginning of another, a line with an arrowhead shows that dependency. The line extends from the end point of the activity which must complete before the other can begin. The line ends up at the start point of the next activity that depends on it. So that one look at such drawings and the dependencies are immediately very clear. Though other types of dependencies also can be shown, it is this relationship that is used more often.

It is immediately obvious, the sequencing and the organization and the WBs that we emphasized in earlier sections makes drawing the Gantt chart that much more effective. The diagram brings out sequential relationships between tasks, if one activity is dependent on another, the overall structure etc. can be visualized very easily. Immediately, the chart turns into a very effective tool for status reporting and a monitoring tool. It clearly speaks the language of time schedules and makes it easy for describing to other stakeholders what’s going on with the project.

For breaking down a project into bite sized chunks, parts of the chart with clearly defined intermediate milestones can help you visualize the pieces equally easily.

Gantt Chart

August 24, 2009
By

A picture is worth a thousand words. That is equally true in case of planning and monitoring the time schedule of a project. Depiction of tasks, interdependence of tasks, the sequence and the organization can actually be shown by a drawing. The picture produced by a few simple drawing artefacts is able to depict these interrelationships and even external dependencies. If you need to divide the project into understandable sub structures the drawings produced by Gantt charts can give you that too.

The Gantt Chart

The Gantt chart is a tool developed by an American engineer Henry Gantt. Though he had developed it as a production control tool it is now used in project time schedule depiction and quite effectively. With a few simple elements this tool can bring out the complete interrelationships of tasks in a project, the sequences used to implement the project and thus the overall structure. Gantt charts illustrate the start and finish dates of the terminal elements and summary elements of a project. Terminal elements and summary elements comprise the WBS of the project. Gantt charts can be used to show current schedule status using percent-complete shadings and a vertical "TODAY" line.

It is really a horizontal bar chart. Each bar depicts an activity and it is shown against a timeline that appears on the horizontal scale of the graph. Vertical axis is not to scale and the activities are described one after another vertically. A corresponding horizontal bar shows the star of the activity and ends at the time when the activity is supposed to end.

So the time relationships of the tasks are immediately apparent from the diagram. Parallel activities appear vertically separated yet over similar time scale. Activities that must follow one another appear sequentially on the chart. Dependencies are depicted by a line. For example if the end of an activity is a necessary pre-condition for the beginning of another, a line with an arrowhead shows that dependency. The line extends from the end point of the activity which must complete before the other can begin. The line ends up at the start point of the next activity that depends on it. So that one look at such drawings and the dependencies are immediately very clear. Though other types of dependencies also can be shown, it is this relationship that is used more often.

It is immediately obvious, the sequencing and the organization and the WBs that we emphasized in earlier sections makes drawing the Gantt chart that much more effective. The diagram brings out sequential relationships between tasks, if one activity is dependent on another, the overall structure etc. can be visualized very easily. Immediately, the chart turns into a very effective tool for status reporting and a monitoring tool. It clearly speaks the language of time schedules and makes it easy for describing to other stakeholders what’s going on with the project.

For breaking down a project into bite sized chunks, parts of the chart with clearly defined intermediate milestones can help you visualize the pieces equally easily.

Popularity: 2% [?]

Tags:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *